Scientists combine spectroscopy and deep learning in an efficient technique for detecting spoiled meat

Scientists at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, combine an inexpensive spectroscopy technique with artificial intelligence to develop a new way of assessing the freshness of beef samples. Their method is remarkably quicker and more cost-effective than conventional approaches while maintaining a relatively high accuracy, paving the way for mass-produced devices to identify spoiled meat both in the industry and at home.

Consuming spoiled beef is dangerous, but there are currently no simple and efficient methods to assess beef freshness. Photo courtesy: Unsplash

Although beef is one of the most consumed foods around the world, eating it when it’s past its prime is not only unsavory…


Scientists develop a radiative cooler that keeps wearable devices cool even under direct sunlight

Wearable devices and biosensors are prone to heating up, especially under sunlight. However, conventional radiative coolers contain metallic materials, which limits wireless communications. Now scientists from Korea and the USA have developed a new type of radiative cooler using perforated polymers that keep the gadgets cool and fully functional under heat, paving the way for thermally protected wearable devices for health monitoring.

Wearable devices and biosensors for outdoor use require innovative designs and novel materials capable of keeping down their temperature, even in sunlight | Photo courtesy: Ketut Subiyanto at Pexels
Wearable devices and biosensors for outdoor use require innovative designs and novel materials capable of keeping down their temperature, even in sunlight | Photo courtesy: Ketut Subiyanto at Pexels
Wearable devices and biosensors for outdoor use require innovative designs and novel materials capable of keeping down their temperature, even in sunlight | Photo courtesy: Ketut Subiyanto at Pexels

Wearable electronic devices like fitness trackers and biosensors, are very promising for healthcare applications and research. They can be used to measure relevant biosignals…


A seemingly small difference in global warming levels could greatly impact wildfires worldwide, researchers have found

The landmark 2015 Paris Agreement resulted in multiple studies examining the impact of global temperature increases, but these rarely investigate the effect of warming on “fire weather” conditions. Now, in a new study, scientists have found that by projecting two different types of fire weather conditions, an additional half-degree of warming could drastically increase the likelihood and significance of blazes worldwide.

Wildfires | Photo Credit: Pexels

Under the 2015 Paris Agreement, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to…


Scientists map the degradation of antibiotic resistance gene mecA by common disinfectants to find ways to minimize the spread of resistance in waterbodies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have become a global threat today, owing in part to the efficiency with which resistance spreads among them. Some of this spread happens in waterbodies — and our wastewater systems are no exception. A group of scientists from Korea and the US has now conducted some of the groundwork needed to optimize disinfection processes and minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance through waterbodies.

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, abound in our wastewater effluents where they could be spreading the resistance gene to other (pathogenic) bacteria. Scientists have now begun to explore ways of preventing this via optimal disinfection processes | Photo courtesy: Prawny on Pixabay
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, abound in our wastewater effluents where they could be spreading the resistance gene to other (pathogenic) bacteria. Scientists have now begun to explore ways of preventing this via optimal disinfection processes | Photo courtesy: Prawny on Pixabay
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, abound in our wastewater effluents where they could be spreading the resistance gene to other (pathogenic) bacteria. Scientists have now begun to explore ways of preventing this via optimal disinfection processes | Photo courtesy: Prawny on Pixabay

For nearly a century, improvement in human healthcare has depended heavily on…


Novel catalyst material promises long-lasting, high-capacity, next-generation rechargeable batteries

Lithium–sulfur batteries, given their light weight and theoretical high capacities, are a promising alternative to conventional lithium-ion batteries for large-scale energy storage systems, drones, electric vehicles, etc. But at present, they suffer from poor battery life, limiting their applicability. Now, scientists from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, have discovered a new catalyst material’s ability to significantly improve lithium–sulfur battery life, opening doors to their near-future practical commercial realization.

Lithium-ion batteries are currently widely used in electronics but lithium–sulfur batteries could replace them in the near future as lighter, cheaper, and a higher capacity alternatives, thanks to a new discovery by scientists in Korea. | Photo Courtesy: AlexLMX from iStock

At the heart of most electronics today are rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). But their energy storage capacities are not enough for…


Study shows that cyclones could affect seemingly unrelated weather disasters in an entirely different continent

In August 2020, the Korean peninsula was hit by 3 devastating typhoons. A recent study by a team of scientists from Korea and the U.S. reveals that these typhoons played a role in the wildfires in Oregon, thousands of miles away. The extreme changes in weather patterns caused by these typhoons reiterate that the consequences of natural disasters are far-reaching and not always limited to the origin.

The wildfires that wrecked Western America in the fall of 2020 may have been worsened by an unexpected source: three typhoons that occurred in the Korean Peninsula mere days before | Unsplash

The year 2020 played host to an uncharacteristically large number of natural disasters. The year began with large…


Scientists demonstrate ground-level ozone concentrations have risen alongside the increasingly frequent spells of dry tropical weather

Although air quality in Korea has been declining over the past few decades, the reasons behind the steady rise in ground-level ozone concentrations are a mystery. In a recent study, scientists from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, investigated the relationship between synoptic weather patterns and ozone levels, revealing another worrisome link between air pollution and climate change.

Air pollution from human activities and dry, sunny weather combine to increase surface ozone concentrations, and ozone emissions are very harmful to health | Photo courtesy: Daniel Moqvist on Unsplash

While ozone in the stratosphere acts as barrier that protects the Earth from ultraviolet radiation, ground-level (or tropospheric) ozone is a dangerous trace gas that…


Scientists place another piece of the puzzle on how introducing alkali metals into crystals of thin-film flexible solar cells improves their efficiency

A group of scientists from Korea has discovered that the amount of alkali metal introduced into crystals of flexible thin-film solar cells influences the path that charge carriers take to traverse between electrodes, thereby affecting the light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Given the immense application potential that such solar cells have today, this finding could be key to ushering in a green future.

Flexible thin-film solar cells constructed via doping with eco-friendly, earth-abundant, and inexpensive alkali metals.
Flexible thin-film solar cells constructed via doping with eco-friendly, earth-abundant, and inexpensive alkali metals.
Flexible thin-film solar cells constructed via doping with eco-friendly, earth-abundant, and inexpensive alkali metals could be the future of a sustainable energy economy. | Source: Pixabay on Pexels

“When eco-friendly, inexpensive, versatile, and efficient solar cells are developed, all thermal and…


Scientists engineer the first passive radiative device that absorbs heat from the inside of an enclosure and emits it on the outside

Scientists from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology have now developed the first passive radiative cooler that can keep the temperature of enclosed spaces low. Their device, called Janus emitter, requires no energy input or conscious effort from the user and is particularly effective for cooling parked vehicles, building interiors, and solar cells — all in a sustainable manner.

The first passive radiative device that absorbs heat from the inside of an enclosure and emits it on the outside
The first passive radiative device that absorbs heat from the inside of an enclosure and emits it on the outside
The bottom layer of the Janus emitter absorbs the heat inside the vehicle and emits it through the top layer to the atmosphere (indicated in blue), causing a temperature drop. The right image shows an experimental model that simulates a vehicle. Photo credit: Young Min Song/GIST

If you have ever stepped into a car parked under the sun, you would be familiar with how hot…


Scientists employ genetically engineered viruses to produce intuitive color-coded sensors for detecting airborne chemicals

In an exciting new study, scientists at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in Korea use genetically engineered viruses to fabricate highly efficient colorimetric sensors, which indicate the presence of specific harmful substances through intuitive color changes. Their design holds a lot of promise for the easy detection of hazardous industrial chemicals and airborne environmental pollutants.

Colorimetric sensors are easy-to-use devices that can reveal information, such as humidity, acidity, or the concentration of certain chemicals, through color changes and an intuitive interface; Photo Courtesy: Shutterstock

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has shown that the world needs technology that can quickly and accurately identify invisible dangers, including harmful substances or airborne environmental pollutants. Colorimetric sensors — devices…

Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST)

GIST is a research-oriented university & a prestigious school in science and technology, located at Gwangju, South Korea. Visit: https://www.gist.ac.kr/en/

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